Narconon

The Narconon Arrowhead facility in Canadian is being investigated for wage claims.

The Oklahoma Department of Labor is investigating wage claims against a Church of Scientology-backed drug rehab center in Pittsburg County, a department representative confirmed.

Oklahoma Department of Labor General Counsel Don Schooler said the department has two wage claims on file against Narconon Arrowhead. Schooler said the department’s Employment Standards Division’s Wage and Hour Unit will conduct investigations to determine whether the wages were due to the individuals making the claims.

Jamie Adams, 32, of McAlester, said she is a former security worker for the facility and she told the News-Capital that she filed a wage claim against Narconon Arrowhead after allegedly being refused payment from her former employer.

According to her wage claim form, Adams worked at Narconon Arrowhead from May 23, 2018, to July 3, 2018, and she maintains she is owed $420 in unpaid wages.

“I have asked numerous times for my wages and they either don’t respond or tell me they don’t have it yet,” Adams claimed.

A message left for the number listed as Narconon Arrowhead was not immediately returned. Another number for a Narconon Arrowhead representative has been disconnected.

Narconon Arrowhead is the flagship drug rehabilitation center for Narconon International. Its parent company, Association for Better Living and Education, is owned by the Church of Scientology.

The 200-bed facility sits on about 250 acres near Lake Eufaula and Canadian, and promotes substance abuse treatment theories of founder L. Ron Hubbard.

Four patients died at Narconon Arrowhead in the span of three years nearly a decade ago. Stacy Murphy, 20, of Owasso, died of an accidental drug overdose at the facility in July 2012. Senate Bill 295 — or “Stacy’s Law” — was signed into law in 2013 to require inpatient drug treatment programs to be certified by the state.

The facility lost its state certification for a medical detox facility under Stacy’s Law and closed in 2013 — but Narconon Arrowhead can legally continue its drug rehabilitation program as a halfway house.

Narconon Arrowhead’s website states it has been accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities since 1992 and includes drug-free withdrawal spaces and a detox center.

Contact Adrian O’Hanlon III at aohanlon@mcalesternews.com